Parent Resources For ADHD Students

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If you’re a parent of an ADHD child, one of your many roles is a case manager for your child. It’s important to understand how to teach ADHD students and to learn more about ADHD accommodations and how ADHD children have problems in school and what works and does not work for them.

Because you may not live in an area where your education system requires teachers to be properly trained on the biggest group of special needs students, the largest group of students with mental health conditions in schools, children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

The cost of ADHD denial or minimization can be very costly and dangerous. ADHD kids have higher rates of school problems, drop outs, huge rates of addictions, crime, depression, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, traffic tickets and accidents, emergency room visits and suicide attempts.

You might even have to do campaigns like this to get politicians to fulfil their promises to ADHD students like the #IEPsForADHD campaign I started.

Hint to teachers, if a child has ADHD, remember, ADHD is the number 2 genetically inherited condition. 80% genetic.

So it’s important the parents get screened for it too, if not for themselves, then for the benefit of their ADHD child.

If the mother or father or both are in denial or minimization about their ADHD, (which may often look different than the child’s ADHD) they will often be in denial or minimization about their child’s ADHD. Which creates worse outcomes at school and home, and it’ll be harder for you to teach them.

Here’s a 5 minute Harvard Adult ADHD Screening Test, and 10 ways to manage adult ADHD.

 

12 Steps To Smarter School Accommodations

Infographic by ADDitude Magazine

 

A Parent’s Guide to AD/HD Basics

Great 20 page PDF from Schwab Learning Here are the articles included.

  • ADHD— an overview
  • Dr. Sam Goldstein explains the best way to evaluate for Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Management strategies for Attention Deficit Disorder
  • What parents need to know about Attention Deficit Disorder and medication: advice from an MD
  • Inattentive Attention Deficit Disorder: overlooked and undertreated?
  • The facts about Attention Deficit Disorder
  • Books articles and web sites

 

ADHD Education Section from CHADD

Covers:

Educational Rights

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

Section 504

Requesting an Evaluation in Public Schools

Tips for Working with the School

Tips for Talking to Teachers about ADHD

Appeals

College

Tips for Completing Homework

How to Communicate with your Child’s Teacher

Homework Help for ADD

 

Assessing College Support Services for Students with ADHD

Kathleen G. Nadeau, author of A College Survival Guide for Students with ADD and LD gives a list of questions that should be asked BEFORE choosing a college or university to see how helpful they will or will not be for you or your ADHD teenager. As she says don’t assume they’ll be all the same.

 

A Guide to the IEP (Individualized Education Program)

From the US department of education

 

Back To School Guide For Canadian Families of Children With ADHD

By CADDAC. Covers:

Look back at Last Year and Review

Review your child’s individualized educational plan, their special education designation (if applicable),

report cards, and communications from school

Get to know your child’s teacher/team

Allow your child’s teacher/team to get to know them and not just their ADHD

Work with your child’s teacher to set up strategies and/or accommodations

 

Homework Help! A System That Works for ADHD Children

Some tips for parents of ADHD children

 

Parent Coaching For Children With Adhd And Learning Disabilities

The self-control and social skills challenge

A child’s “thinking side” versus “reacting side”

The verbal playbook

Touching on triggers

Coaching to win

 

Targeting Home-School Collaboration for Students with ADHD

by Candace S. Bos, Maria L. Nahmias and Magda A. Urban. Gives suggestions for parent involvement in assessment and behaviour plan, monitoring medication, coordinating homework, taking action, references, and resources.

Related How To Teach ADHD Students Posts

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